In Praise of Police

A discussion on all aspects of Engaged Buddhism
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Nicholas
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In Praise of Police

Post by Nicholas » Sat Jun 20, 2020 5:15 pm

Paul Harvey is gone now, but he outlines the bravery & sacrifice nearly all police do for the benefit of society:

May all seek, find and follow the Path of Buddhas.

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Nicholas
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Re: In Praise of Police

Post by Nicholas » Sat Jun 20, 2020 5:20 pm

A reminder of humans who are, in the main, braver and more sacrificial in their dedication to protect and serve society.

May all seek, find and follow the Path of Buddhas.

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Nicholas
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Re: In Praise of Police

Post by Nicholas » Sat Jun 20, 2020 5:23 pm

From an experienced policeman, who knows about the few bad cops & the many who are good and a blessing to society.

May all seek, find and follow the Path of Buddhas.

Jason
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Re: In Praise of Police

Post by Jason » Sat Jun 20, 2020 7:22 pm

Counterpoint, a collection of recording of police violence just during these protests alone, many against unarmed, peaceful protesters and journalists. Those protesters are also human beings and are being attacked by the people they pay to serve and protect them.

reiun
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Re: In Praise of Police

Post by reiun » Sun Jun 21, 2020 2:20 am

Paul Harvey claims 1/2 of one percent of police are "misfits'.

The Cato Institute answers:

The U.S. government does not regularly collect data on police misconduct. One attempt to track misconduct is the Cato Institute's National Police Misconduct Reporting Project, which estimates misconduct rates using newspaper reports.[110] The project's data suggest that police are more likely than the average person to commit a number of crimes including assault, sexual assault, and murder, but less likely to commit robbery. The NPMSRP projects that roughly 1 in 4.7 officers will be implicated in an act of misconduct during the course of their career.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police_mi ... r%20career.

NA Buddhist
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Re: In Praise of Police

Post by NA Buddhist » Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:01 am

Nicholas wrote:
Sat Jun 20, 2020 5:15 pm
Paul Harvey is gone now, but he outlines the bravery & sacrifice nearly all police do for the benefit of society:
Do you know you can copy a rough transcript from youtube?
You have to edit out timemarks.

Here is opening of the Paul Harvey piece.
A policeman is a composite of
what all men are I guess. A mingling of
saint and sinner, dust and deity. Culled
statistics wave the fan over stinkers
underscore instances of dishonesty and
brutality because they are news. What
that really means is that they are
exceptional, they are unusual, they are
not commonplace.
Buried under the froth
is the fact and the fact is that
less than 1/2 of 1% of policemen misfit that uniform
-- and that is a better average than you'd find among clergymen.
Or how about among Buddhists?

And there is the rub. What are we comparing the very real bad behavior to? And what standard of behavior.?

So lets not avoid the unpleasant. What percentage of Buddhist's in robes might be said to 'misfit' their robes?
If we look only in the US -- what percentage of monks, nuns, and 'dharma teachers' have been named in publically reported scandals?

There are systemic problems in western Buddhism that too often lead to gross mismanagement. A frequent factor is the universal challenge of working with charismatic leaders. For one example I have first hand knowledge of several Buddhist monasteries, retreat centers or temples that wasted considerable amounts of money on grounds and buildings. Sometimes to the tune of hundreds of thousands in donations. In every case the advice of qualified laypeople -- advise which would have prevented the loss -- was either either ignored or not sought. In most cases this was stuff that a competent do-it-yourself-er would know. Acknowledgements of the mistakes were the exception in my experience.

For each of the monastics involved I have little regret that I had the privilege and benefit of spending time with them. I learned and at times was well taught by each of them. And yet, by a high standard of ethics, of the monastics and ordained dharma teachers I have the privilege of knowing less than half might be said to 'fit their robes'.

Shocking? Well ... depends I guess it depends on just how powerful you view the Buddha's 3 named causes of dukka. To me the Buddha often feels like he was almost a cynic. The first two Noble Truths feel that way. The last two point to some solutions. So should we. And I will in another post.

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Nicholas
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Re: In Praise of Police

Post by Nicholas » Mon Jun 29, 2020 4:51 pm

NA Buddhist wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:01 am
Nicholas wrote:
Sat Jun 20, 2020 5:15 pm
Paul Harvey is gone now, but he outlines the bravery & sacrifice nearly all police do for the benefit of society:
Do you know you can copy a rough transcript from youtube?
You have to edit out timemarks.

Here is opening of the Paul Harvey piece.
[.....]

Shocking? Well ... depends I guess it depends on just how powerful you view the Buddha's 3 named causes of dukka. To me the Buddha often feels like he was almost a cynic. The first two Noble Truths feel that way. The last two point to some solutions. So should we. And I will in another post.
No NA I did not know about text from audio at Youtube. Nor is it shocking to find monastics are often not Aryas.

Buddha is a realist, as are many Buddhists. So he knew fully the general tendency of most humans is down stream toward the sea of samsara. But there are some with only a "little dust in their eyes". So for them He gave "against the current" ways to reduce suffering or even end it.
May all seek, find and follow the Path of Buddhas.

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