Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Applying the Dharma for the preservation of planet Earth and its inhabitants
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SarathW
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Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by SarathW »

Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?
Perhaps this topic is too early for discussion. However, I thought of posting this after seen the comment by David in Dhamma Wheel.
Our politicians continue to disregard the possibility of an epidemic after many warnings by the science community such as Bill Gates.
We have seen how epidemics such as Ebola was spread in Africa.
We always thought it is them not us.
Just imagine we had the Coronavirus with the death rate of an Ebola epidemic.
Now it is time to think about an epidemic like Ebola with the infection rate like a Coronavirus.
Perhaps the Coronavirus is only a warning signal.

What other positive come and will come from this disaster?
Will this stop the nuclear war?
Will we learn to love one another?
Is this good for the environment?
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Risto J
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

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SarathW
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by SarathW »

It appears Bill Gates sees a silver line.

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mikenz66
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by mikenz66 »

The positive I can see is that people are realising that this affects everyone, so the only possible response is a compassionate one: to care for each other. The more sensible leaders have got that point. That's a good start.

:heart:
Mike
SarathW
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by SarathW »

Cuomo said of the coronavirus: "No one has been here before and this is going to change us. It is going to help form a new generation and I can see it in my daughters' eyes.”

He said many people who never experienced a “national crisis” like the way the coronavirus is affecting the country will be “formative” for society.
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/11264300/ ... ters-eyes/

It is very interesting to know how this going to affect young people.
If you know someone young please report here their thoughts.
Will this affect young people the same way it affected people after world war 2?
My experience is that two young people who are close to me, call me for the first time and ask me whether I am OK and need any help!!
:heart:
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mikenz66
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by mikenz66 »

SarathW wrote: Sat Mar 28, 2020 11:09 pm My experience is that two young people who are close to me, call me for the first time and ask me whether I am OK and need any help!!
:heart:
That's great! :heart:
SarathW
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by SarathW »

The environment seems to be the winner, temporary at lest.

SarathW
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by SarathW »

I am not sure this is a true documentary but interesting to watch.
This coronavirus is like watching a Hollywood movie in real-time!

Miorita
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by Miorita »

It's touchy to see how samsara gets a reprive, even if it's a small one.
My teacher, Garchen, loves with love and simplicity all sentient beings.
Prior to him there were the webcasts of Ch. Namkhai Norbu where occasionally you could observe a dog coming to people for some food or just to be around people.
It highlights the responsibility one has towards other beings, inferior, that rely on that respective achievement. It is not enough to be the victor if one is lacking the heart to preserve life as is.
Dedicate your merits of practice!
What you are now, they will be. Be their light in a dark world!
:anjali:
Miorita
Om Tare Tuttare Ture Soha - they say she helps remove obstacles
Relax! Do your best!
SarathW
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by SarathW »

The enoumus effort by the airline idustry to keep the planes in operating condition.
This is like a real life drama!

SarathW
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by SarathW »

Will the world will be united against the common enemy no 1 the Coronavirus?
Bundokji
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by Bundokji »

SarathW wrote: Sun Aug 16, 2020 10:43 am Will the world will be united against the common enemy no 1 the Coronavirus?
Coronavirus seems to be more of a divisive issue than a unifying factor. Should it be perceived as enemy number 1 to being with? and would that be helpful to people and nations?

The following article was published on the BBC three days ago:
Coronavirus: Is it time to move on and get back to normal life?

Are the government and media overdoing coronavirus? Is it time to move on and get back to normal life?

These are big questions, and given the parlous state of the economy, they deserve some attention.

Let me start with some positives, which may help encourage the viewpoint I see a lot on social media, that Covid is over, finished, done with.

The trend in deaths and serious illness continues to decline.

The number of patients in hospital who have a confirmed Covid-19 diagnosis has been falling for months.

At the peak in the UK there were around 20,000 - now it's fewer than 800.

At one stage whole intensive care units were full of Covid-19 patients, many of them on ventilators for several weeks.

Again, thankfully, the numbers on ventilators have continued to fall, from 3,300 to 64.

There are many ways of counting Covid-related deaths, but they all show mortality peaked in April and has been falling ever since.

If we look solely at those who died within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test, this has fallen by 99% from nearly 1,000 a day to, on average, less than 10.

That compares to an average of 30 men a day who die from prostate cancer, and 30 women from breast cancer. Neither of these figures is read out nightly on the TV news, unlike the statistics for cases and coronavirus deaths.

True, confirmed coronavirus cases have been rising for a couple of months, but this can be largely explained by increases in testing. The number of swab tests done in the community has doubled since the start of July. More swabbing of noses and throats leads to more detection of the virus, but that has not yet translated into more hospital cases.

The latest ONS infection survey suggests around 2,200 infections a day in England, with rates remaining fairly constant in the past month after a slight increase in July.

So things have changed a lot since the start of the outbreak in the UK.

"If you go back to March and April, there was a larger pool of susceptible people, with 1,000 outbreaks in care homes in one week. Now those getting the infection are much younger and they are less affected," says Carl Heneghan, professor of evidence-based medicine at the University of Oxford.

"Secondly, the virus is circulating at a much lower level. With social distancing people are more likely to get a 'glancing blow' and have to deal with a much smaller amount of virus and so be less likely to get seriously ill."

If you do end up in hospital, your chances of surviving Covid-19 have improved significantly. Medical teams now have a far better understanding of how to combat the virus with more effective treatments, such as dexamethasone.

I'm the BBC's medical editor. Since 2004 I have reported on a huge range of topics from cancer, genetics, malaria, and HIV, to the many significant advances in medical science which have improved people's health. I've also followed pandemic threats such as bird flu as well as Sars and Mers. Now I'm focusing on Covid-19 and its immense global impact.

Globally, Covid-19 case numbers are now in excess of 24 million and rise by around a million every four days.

There have been well over 800,000 deaths since the beginning of the pandemic.

But it has a long way to go to outstrip the mortality from another infectious disease, tuberculosis.

TB, an airborne bacterial infection, kills around 1.5 million people each year, nearly all in developing countries. It is a disease largely of poverty and malnourishment, targeting those with weakened immune systems, often due to co-infection with HIV.

Unlike Covid, it can be cured with antibiotics, although there has been a worrying rise in highly drug-resistant TB.

But back to the question: Is it time to get back to normal life?

If that means getting children back into the classroom, then yes. The evidence is that they are at vanishingly low risk from coronavirus, yet risk significant harm from lack of education.

What about the rest of us? There's no doubt that Covid-19 can be a devastating condition. We are just beginning to understand the potential long-term harms from the disease.

The older you are, the greater your risk - although a 70-year-old triathlete may well have a stronger immune system than a sedentary, obese 40-year-old.

Statistics guru Prof David Spiegelhalter reckons an 80-year-old male has a 500 times higher risk of dying from Covid than a 20-year-old.

We are far from any sort of triumph over this brutal disease. I have seen first-hand what it can do to people in intensive care, many of them previously fit and healthy. It is largely a serious disease of the elderly, but there is at times a frightening randomness about who it strikes down.

What we all really want to know is what is going to happen this autumn. We are currently in a sweet spot with coronavirus.

It's still - just - summer. Respiratory viruses don't circulate as well in the summer months. We are still spending time out of doors. Most of us are social distancing: I can't remember the last time I shook hands with anyone. So the virus has had less chance to jump from one person to the next. But coronavirus is still out there.

The next few weeks are going to be critical in understanding whether transmission rates will rise sharply again as schools and universities go back and people return to offices and spend more time indoors.

"We know that winter in the northern hemisphere is when respiratory viruses really take off. So this is not over yet, and things could get an awful lot worse," says virologist Prof Wendy Barclay, from Imperial College London.

There are already worrying signs from France where not only cases, but Covid-related illness is increasing.

More than 800 coronavirus patients are being admitted to hospital each week, up from 500 six weeks ago, according to French prime minister Jean Castex. Face masks are now compulsory in all public places in Paris.


Here, the Health Secretary Matt Hancock, in an interview in the Times, said a second wave was "a very serious threat".

"It is a mistake for people to think this infection is over," says Prof Carl Heneghan. "The virus is still circulating and if we lose our vigilance, rates will go up. I think we need simple clear messages to the public which stress the importance of handwashing and social distancing."

He would like to see a more Swedish-style approach, where a lockdown never happened and schools remained open.

"They did not do nothing, but rather engaged in socially responsible collective action. This meant restaurants remained open, but people socially distanced and were mindful, conscious of what was required."

It would be helpful to know how many people have some immunity to Sars-CoV-2.

Perhaps one in 10 of us has antibodies to the virus. But then there is the role of T-cells, which play a key role in fighting infection by identifying and destroying infected cells.

"There is evidence coming through that at least some of the internal proteins of the four seasonal coronaviruses (which cause the common cold) can cross-react with T-cells, so a recent infection with one of them might be helpful," says Prof Wendy Barclay.

She also thinks the virus is here to stay.

"I think Sars-CoV-2 has successfully transitioned from animals into humans and the chances of eradicating it are slim. The best hope is going to be a vaccine, which could be administered in a similar way to the flu vaccine, to help those who are most vulnerable."

We are certainly much better prepared for any second wave than at the start of the outbreak according to Eleanor Riley, professor of immunology and infectious diseases at the University of Edinburgh.

"We will see an increase in cases but I don't think it's inevitable that we will have the level of hospital admissions and deaths we saw back in April," she says.

"We know enough now about our own individual risks that we can protect older people and those with significant health problems, whilst allowing the rest of the population to get on with their lives."

That means we all still have a role to play in curbing the outbreak. Social distancing and hand hygiene still matter. If you can't remember how many people you are allowed in your back garden, or whether it's OK to give two people from different households a lift to the shops, at least remember to wash your hands and not get too close to those you don't live with

Many remain fearful of what may come.
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-53951764
'Too much knowledge leads to scepticism. Early devotees are the likeliest apostates, as early sinners are senile saints.' – Will Durant.
mutsuk
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by mutsuk »

Bundokji wrote: Tue Sep 01, 2020 8:41 am
There are already worrying signs from France where not only cases, but Covid-related illness is increasing.
And it is directly caused by a paradoxically very large fringe of the population which apprehended the end of the lockdown as an authorization to go straight back to their usual habits of the "world before". News networks are constantly questioning the necessity of wearing the mask.
Bundokji
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by Bundokji »

mutsuk wrote: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:33 am
Bundokji wrote: Tue Sep 01, 2020 8:41 am
There are already worrying signs from France where not only cases, but Covid-related illness is increasing.
And it is directly caused by a paradoxically very large fringe of the population which apprehended the end of the lockdown as an authorization to go straight back to their usual habits of the "world before". News networks are constantly questioning the necessity of wearing the mask.
Questioning the necessity of wearing masks and the desire to get back to usual habits is part of the path towards recovery. Having more infections before winter might be beneficial. even if it goes against the grain of linear thinking.

The recent demonstrations in Europe, especially in Germany, shows a healthy degree of skepticism against state and elites mandates and impositions. One of the activists who participated in the recent demonstrations in Germany is Robert F Kennedy Jr. Usually, his main focus is on environmental issues especially water. His views on vaccination and wearing masks might be more controversial, but it does not make him a fundamentalist in my view. I had the chance to meet him in real life.

'Too much knowledge leads to scepticism. Early devotees are the likeliest apostates, as early sinners are senile saints.' – Will Durant.
mutsuk
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by mutsuk »

Bundokji wrote: Tue Sep 01, 2020 12:18 pm Questioning the necessity of wearing masks and the desire to get back to usual habits is part of the path towards recovery.
Sure but we're not in a process of recovery yet, since the numbers of infected people is increasing constantly.
Having more infections before winter might be beneficial.
I'm not an MD but a specialist recently said on a French TV that those infected now may develop serious pathologies (cardiac, vascular, and pulmonary) in the next decade. I have no idea if this is BS or well-informed. Just sharing that. Please don't hesitate to correct if data demonstrate or contradict this.
Bundokji
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by Bundokji »

mutsuk wrote: Tue Sep 01, 2020 12:49 pm Sure but we're not in a process of recovery yet, since the numbers of infected people is increasing constantly
Birth is the prime cause of death. The road to recovery began with the recording of the very first case.

I'm not an MD but a specialist recently said on a French TV that those infected now may develop serious pathologies (cardiac, vascular, and pulmonary) in the next decade. I have no idea if this is BS or well-informed. Just sharing that. Please don't hesitate to correct if data demonstrate or contradict this.
For people who are aware that one cannot predict with certainty what's going to happen to him/her after five minutes, would take such speculations with a pinch of salt
'Too much knowledge leads to scepticism. Early devotees are the likeliest apostates, as early sinners are senile saints.' – Will Durant.
mutsuk
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by mutsuk »

Bundokji wrote: Tue Sep 01, 2020 1:30 pm
mutsuk wrote: Tue Sep 01, 2020 12:49 pm Sure but we're not in a process of recovery yet, since the numbers of infected people is increasing constantly
Birth is the prime cause of death. The road to recovery began with the recording of the very first case.

I'm not an MD but a specialist recently said on a French TV that those infected now may develop serious pathologies (cardiac, vascular, and pulmonary) in the next decade. I have no idea if this is BS or well-informed. Just sharing that. Please don't hesitate to correct if data demonstrate or contradict this.
For people who are aware that one cannot predict with certainty what's going to happen to him/her after five minutes, would take such speculations with a pinch of salt
Are you a specialist in corona-viruses in general?
Bundokji
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by Bundokji »

mutsuk wrote: Tue Sep 01, 2020 1:42 pm Are you a specialist in corona-viruses in general?
No
'Too much knowledge leads to scepticism. Early devotees are the likeliest apostates, as early sinners are senile saints.' – Will Durant.
Bundokji
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Re: Coronavirus -Is this the silver line in the rain cloud?

Post by Bundokji »

Coronavirus presented individuals and society with unprecedented challenges. The dividing line between prudence and phobia has never been as blurred as what we are witnessing nowadays.

Thanatophobia Diagnosis and Treatment
Fear of Death


Thanatophobia, or fear of death, is a relatively complicated phobia. Many, if not most, people are afraid of dying. Some people fear being dead, while others are afraid of the actual act of dying. However, if the fear is so prevalent as to affect your daily life, then you might have a full-blown phobia.

The Role of Religion

Many people's fear of death is tied to their religious beliefs, particularly if they happen to be going through a period of questioning. Some people think that they know what will happen after death, but worry that they may be wrong. Some believe that the path to salvation is very straight and narrow, and fear that any deviations or mistakes may cause them to be eternally condemned.

Religious beliefs are highly personalized, and even a therapist of the same general faith may not fully understand a client's beliefs. If the fear of death is religiously based, it is often helpful to seek supplemental counseling from one's own religious leader. However, this should never be used to replace traditional mental health counseling.

Types of Fears

There are numerous reasons for thanatophobia, some of which commonly include the following.

Fear of the Unknown

Thanatophobia may also have roots in fears of the unknown. It is part of the human condition to want to know and understand the world around us. What happens after death, however, cannot be unequivocally proven while we are still alive.

However, at least one study has found that increasing your emotional intelligence can help you deal with your fear of the unknown, thereby lessening your fear of death.

Fear of Loss of Control


Like knowledge, control is something for which humans strive. Yet the act of dying is utterly outside anyone's control. Those who fear the loss of control may attempt to hold death at bay through rigorous and sometimes extreme health checks and other rituals.

Over time, it is easy to see how people with this type of thanatophobia may be at risk for obsessive-compulsive disorder, illness anxiety disorder (formerly called hypochondriasis), and even delusional thinking.

Fear of Pain, Illness, or Loss of Dignity


Some people with an apparent fear of death do not actually fear death itself. Instead, they are afraid of the circumstances that often surround the act of dying. They may be afraid of crippling pain, debilitating illness, or even the associated loss of dignity.

This type of thanatophobia may be identified through careful questioning about the specifics of the fear. Many people with this type of fear also suffer from nosophobia, illness anxiety disorder, or other somatoform disorders.

Fear of Abandoning Relatives

Many people who suffer from thanatophobia are not nearly as afraid to die as they are of what would happen to their families after their death.

Fear of Death in Children

A child's fear of death can be devastating to the parent, but may actually be a healthy part of normal development. Children generally lack the defense mechanisms, religious beliefs, and understanding of death that help adults cope. They also do not fully understand time, making it difficult for them to accept that people sometimes leave and come back again.

These factors can lead children to a muddled and sometimes terrifying concept of what it means to be dead. Whether the fear qualifies as a phobia depends on its severity and the length of time it has been present.

Related Fears


It is not uncommon for people who suffer from thanatophobia to develop related phobias as well. Fears of tombstones, funeral homes, and other symbols of death are common, as they can serve as reminders of the main phobia. Fear of ghosts or other entities is also common, particularly in those whose thanatophobia is based on religious factors.

Thanatophobia Diagnosis

As there are so many possible causes and complications, it is important that thanatophobia is diagnosed only by a trained mental health professional.

He can ask guided questions and help the sufferer figure out exactly what is going on. She can also recognize the symptoms of related disorders and prescribe the appropriate course of treatment.

Treatment for Thanatophobia

The course of treatment largely depends on the client's personal goals for therapy. Is she trying to resolve a religious conflict? Does he simply want to be able to attend Halloween events without panicking?

The therapist must first determine the client's expectations before designing a treatment plan.

When to Seek Help for Thanatophobia


Whether or not to seek treatment for any phobia is a very personal decision. Regardless of whether you choose to get professional assistance, coping with the fear of death can be an ongoing daily struggle.

Unlike many phobias that are triggered by specific incidents, such as seeing a spider, thanatophobia may be constantly at the back of your mind. You may be interested in discussing this phobia with others who share your fear.
https://www.verywellmind.com/thanatophobia-2671879
'Too much knowledge leads to scepticism. Early devotees are the likeliest apostates, as early sinners are senile saints.' – Will Durant.
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