Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Applying the Dharma for the preservation of planet Earth and its inhabitants
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Kim O'Hara
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Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Kim O'Hara » Tue Jun 12, 2018 6:31 am

This thread is for general discussion of climate change mitigation and adaptation technologies.

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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Kim O'Hara » Tue Jun 12, 2018 6:35 am

Climate Change Can Be Stopped by Turning Air Into Gasoline

A Harvard professor says his company should be able to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, at industrial scales, by 2021.

... the new technique is noteworthy because it promises to remove carbon dioxide cheaply. As recently as 2011, a panel of experts estimated that it would cost at least $600 to remove a metric ton of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

The new paper says it can remove the same ton for as little as $94, and for no more than $232. ...

“If these costs are real, it is an important result,” said Ken Caldeira, a senior scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science. “This opens up the possibility that we could stabilize the climate for affordable amounts of money without changing the entire energy system or changing everyone’s behavior.” ...

“What we’ve done is build a [direct-air capture] process that is—as much as possible—built on existing processes and technologies that are widespread in the world,” said David Keith, a professor of applied physics at Harvard and the lead author of the new study. “That’s why we think we have a reasonable possibility of scaling up.”

Keith is also a founder and executive chairman of Carbon Engineering, a Bill Gates–funded company that has studied how to directly remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Carbon Engineering says the technique unveiled today has already been implemented at its small, pilot plant in Squamish, British Columbia. It is currently seeking funding to build an industrial-scale version of the plant, which Keith says it can complete by 2021. ...

Outside experts said they were encouraged by Keith and his colleagues’ approach, but cautioned that it would take time to examine every cost estimate and engineering advance in the paper. The consensus response was something like: Hmm! I hope this works!

“I don’t question that the range of costs they report are valid. I think the lower end of $100 per ton of CO2 produced through their approach is probably doable in five years or so and that their higher end of $250 per [ton of] CO2 is more doable with their technology today,” says Jennifer Wilcox, an associate professor at the Colorado School of Mines. ...
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/arc ... dy/562289/

Not a silver bullet, then, but a useful step forward.

:namaste:
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Re: Climate change mitigation - omnibus thread

Post by chownah » Tue Jun 12, 2018 9:24 am

I read another article (can't find it now) on this process. It said that the cost for carbon removal was based on using non-carbon generating power....they are using hydro in british columbia...I think that not only is the power there non-carbon generating but it is also very cheap.
So, if what I remember reading is correct then if running the process on non-carbon generating power gives a cost (for example) of $100 per ton then if they instead used a carbon emitting source of power that emitted a half ton of carbon in powering the process then it would effectively be only removing half a ton....when in effect doubles the cost.

Anyway, its good to see that there is advancement on this. I think that it will almost assuredly always be cheaper to avoid emitting carbon than it will be to remove it from the air.
chownah

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Re: Climate change mitigation - omnibus thread

Post by Dorje Shedrub » Tue Jun 12, 2018 9:22 pm

Interesting. The other day I went to a local Chinese restaurant to celebrate my birthday and I got into a conversation with two other tables (only four customers in restaurant) and one man was talking about the new business he is going to start up. I dont remember the technical name, but he is going to take air into a refrigerated box contraption and the gases naturally settle into different layers, then he pumps out CO2, O2, Argon, Nitrogen, and sells them. He plans on hiring workers that are recovering drug addicts. I wish I had thought to ask about his power source. In this area I have seen some farmers and small industry use wind power.

DS
"As far as social economic theory is concerned, I am Marxist. " ~ HHDL

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Climate change mitigation and adapattion - omnibus thread

Post by Leeuwenhoek » Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:33 am

This thread is for general discussion of adaptation to climate change.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) defines adaption as:
“The process of adjustment to actual or expected climate and its effects.
In human systems, adaptation seeks to moderate harm or exploit beneficial opportunities. In natural systems, human intervention may facilitate adjustment to expected climate and its effects”
Adaptation needs to refer to circumstances requiring information, resources, and action to ensure safety of populations and security of assets in response to climate impacts. Adaptation options are the array of strategies and measures available and appropriate to address needs.
- AR4 WGII Chap 14
The key IPCC document on climate adaption is:
  • Climate Change 2014, Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability, Part A: Global and Sectoral Aspects
    Working Group II Contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    Also known as AR5 WGII
    -- http://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/wg2/
  • See also: the IPCC Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX)
FYI: AR4 - the 4th Assessment reports were titled Climate Change 2007

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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Leeuwenhoek » Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:07 am

The Chinese government announced it will dramatically cut its solar power subsidies
China’s Bombshell Solar Policy Shift Could Cut Expected Capacity by 20 Gigawatts
Demand in China exceeding expectations? Analysts say “that is not going to be the case anymore.”
China’s recently announced changes to national solar policies will bring significant impacts for the global PV market and possibly the first contraction in global PV demand since before 2000, according to GTM Research.

The country’s National Energy Administration, the National Development and Reform Commission and the Ministry of Finance released new guidance that terminates any approvals for new subsidized utility-scale PV power stations in 2018.

“When the industry talks about China, it’s always about how demand in the region exceeds expectations,” said Jade Jones, a senior solar analyst at GTM Research. “That is not going to be the case anymore.”

The policy changes are an effort to stem the country’s ballooning subsidy costs, which rang in at RMB 100 billion (about $15.6 billion) last year. China hasn’t been able to pay out those sums. Wood Mackenzie projected they may reach RMB 250 billion (about $39 billion) by 2020.
-- https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles ... -gigawatts
Last week, the Chinese government announced it would halt approvals of new subsidized utility-scale solar plants, limit the amount of smaller-scale distributed generation installed and shrink the subsidies it provides to solar generators. All told, these policies are expected to cut the amount of solar capacity installed this year in China by 30 to 40 percent ...

While the announcement by China sent a shock through the solar industry, it wasn't entirely surprising, according to BNEF.
The costs of the subsidies the government provides to the renewable energy industry have been growing at an unsustainable rate, analysts said. The nation's solar producers have also had to curtail their actual output because they've grown faster than the grid's capacity. The cut in subsidies will address both of those problems by slowing growth, Frank Yu, an analyst with Wood Mackenzie in Beijing, said in a research note.

Wind energy has faced similar issues in China, and officials have discussed cutting subsidies for that industry as well.

... This week, Chinese solar firms sent a letter to their government urging it to delay the new policies, saying they faced huge debts and needed a few more years of subsidies to be more competitive.
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/0806 ... -bnef-seia
Notes:
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/0806 ... -bnef-seia
Capacity factors of solar in the US: https://www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly ... pmt_6_07_b

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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Leeuwenhoek » Thu Jun 21, 2018 7:43 pm

This is about creating a sober, realistic picture of the nature of the challenge of climate mitigation.
There is a understandable tenancy among advocates of 'urgent action' to use narratives such as (in a more extreme form) "we can do it now with current technologies ... if only we have the will". Some of us see that as an unlikely path to progress.

Is getting to 2°C feasible? Yes ...but difficult with current policies, technologies and competing interests. (Vested interests on 'both sides' I'd say. Opposition to the use of nuclear energy is but one example.)

The models that take us to a world where global warming is limited to 2°C, are much too optimistic, according to Glen Peters at CICERO.

CICERO Center for International Climate Research
CICERO is Norway’s foremost institute for interdisciplinary climate research.
5°C is the temperature increase above pre-industrial levels we are heading for if we follow our path of limited or no climate policy. 2°C is the temperature increase above pre-industrial levels that most countries around the world have agreed would prevent dangerous climate change.

There will be climate impacts at 2°C, but we believe we can manage them. This journey will describe how the energy system must change if we go from 5°C to 2°C.

So is getting to 2°C feasible?
- Yes, says Peters.
- But only in the models.
https://www.cicero.oslo.no/en/posts/new ... m-5c-to-2c

Important points:
  • Many model's assume negative CO2 emissions. That means technologies that remove CO2 from the air.
  • Although not stated in the video -- getting to a zero-carbon electrical grid only eliminates some of the emissions.
  • Zero-carbon electrical energy is considered the "low hanging fruit" and a stepping stone for further progress. For example, replacing electricity for fossil fuels in a number of applications in industry, at home, and in some modes of transportation.

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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Leeuwenhoek » Thu Jun 21, 2018 8:15 pm

Image
The data above, which comes from the International Energy Agency (historical) and PwC (future), comes as a surprise to many people. It shows that decarbonization rates have not changed from before the climate policy era (1971-1992: 1971 is the start of the IEA dataset and 1992 is the year of the Rio Convention) to after it began (measured as after Rio 1992 or after Kyoto 1997).
... Each nation has its own story, which can be spun as more or less successful. But if we are being honest with ourselves, none is remotely close to what is needed according to the targets that these countries have putatively agreed to meet.
-- https://theclimatefix.wordpress.com/2018/06/
------------
Related evidence and opinion:
James Hansen, father of climate change awareness, calls Paris talks 'a fraud' (2015)
The former Nasa scientist criticizes the talks, intended to reach a new global deal on cutting carbon emissions beyond 2020, as ‘no action, just promises’ - https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... alks-fraud
Ex-Nasa scientist: 30 years on, world is failing 'miserably’ to address climate change (2018)
James Hansen, who gave a climate warning in 1988 Senate testimony, says real hoax is by leaders claiming to take action

... Hansen provided what’s considered the first warning to a mass audience about global warming when, in 1988, he told a US congressional hearing he could declare “with 99% confidence” that a recent sharp rise in temperatures was a result of human activity.
Since this time, the world’s greenhouse gas emissions have mushroomed ...

All we’ve done is agree there’s a problem,” Hansen told the Guardian. “We agreed that in 1992 [at the Earth summit in Rio] and re-agreed it again in Paris [at the 2015 climate accord]. We haven’t acknowledged what is required to solve it. Promises like Paris don’t mean much, it’s wishful thinking. It’s a hoax that governments have played on us since the 1990s.”

Hansen’s long list of culprits for this inertia are both familiar – the nefarious lobbying of the fossil fuel industry – and surprising. Jerry Brown, the progressive governor of California, and the German chancellor, Angela Merkel, are “both pretending to be solving the problemwhile being unambitious and shunning low-carbon nuclear power, Hansen argues.

... former [US] president [Barack Obama] “failed miserably” on climate change and oversaw policies that were “late, ineffectual and partisan”.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... ge-warning
---------------------------

Map of carbon emissions: http://www.globalcarbonatlas.org/en/CO2-emissions
Click on "Units" on the left hand side and change to " tCO₂/person" -- CO2 emissions per person

Closing thought: There are so many ways and directions in which one can plausibly point fingers of blame. That realization gives me some self insights and makes it a bit easier to back off from my own attachments. Especially to partisan explanations. Dukkha really is the common background of human existence -- no matter what your political ideology, favorite party, etc. I call on Buddhists to assume that applies doubly to "engaged social/political Buddhism".

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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Kim O'Hara » Thu Jun 21, 2018 10:41 pm

Two good posts, Leeuwenhoek - thanks.

The path to a liveable world is steeper every month we delay the big policy changes which are needed.
And for me, the crux is policy, which always comes back to political willpower - there just isn't enough of it yet!

Better technology would help,of course, but I think we can do it with existing technology - if we really start putting it out there - and we don't need to wait for a silver bullet. Can't afford to wait, anyway.
Carbon taxes would accelerate the transition away from fossil fuels and towards renewables. So would bans on further exploration for fossil fuels - it's absolutely nutty to issue exploration permits for resources which we know will have to stay in the ground.
Divestment programmes are already having good results but we could do with more action there, too. Market Forces - https://www.marketforces.org.au/about-us/ - is the one I know but I'm sure there are others internationally.

:jedi:
Kim

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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Kim O'Hara » Mon Jun 25, 2018 9:52 pm

A good-news story :smile:
Solar Just Hit a Record Low Price In the U.S.

Even Donald Trump’s solar tariffs and desire to prop up the coal industry can’t stop renewable energy. A solar auction in Nevada just yielded the cheapest solar project in the country.

It broke a record that was set [checks calendar] last week. Not only that, the price the plant will operate at is cheaper than new natural gas and coal plants. ...

The project in question is the Eagle Shadow Mountain Solar Farm, which will begin operating in 2021. The farm will have a generating capacity of 300 megawatts, enough to power about 210,000 American homes. But it’s the price part that’s eye-popping. It will operate at a flat rate of $23.76 per megawatt-hour over the course of a 25-year power purchasing agreement ... “these bids, un-subsidized, are still cheaper than any new coal or gas plants, and possibly cheaper than operating existing plants.” ...

The Nevada auction also included a number of projects that link up utility-scale solar with batteries. Mastering solar plus storage will be critical for renewables to truly overtake fossil fuels, since they only generate power when it’s sunny or when the wind blows. ...

A report released by the Solar Energy Industries Association on Tuesday revealed that 55 percent of all U.S. electricity generating capacity installed in the first quarter of 2018 was solar. A whopping 2.5 gigawatts of solar was added, marking the 10th straight quarter where more than 2 gigawatts of capacity added. The report also noted that total installed capacity could double in the next five years.

All this is good news, but the transition away from fossil fuels towards renewables needs to happen even faster to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.
:namaste:
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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by chownah » Tue Jun 26, 2018 3:09 am

Kim O'Hara wrote:
Mon Jun 25, 2018 9:52 pm

All this is good news, but the transition away from fossil fuels towards renewables needs to happen even faster to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.
No matter how fast we move towards renewables this statement will be true.
chownah

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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Kim O'Hara » Tue Jun 26, 2018 3:16 am

chownah wrote:
Tue Jun 26, 2018 3:09 am
Kim O'Hara wrote:
Mon Jun 25, 2018 9:52 pm

All this is good news, but the transition away from fossil fuels towards renewables needs to happen even faster to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.
No matter how fast we move towards renewables this statement will be true.
chownah
Indeed. We actually need to reverse carbon emissions - start taking CO2 out of the air - to get back to the climate we had 50 years ago. But every reduction in emissions helps, and IMO we need to celebrate it (within reason) to maintain our motivation by reassuring ourselves that we can still make a difference. As I've said before, it is never too late to make things less bad.

:namaste:
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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by chownah » Tue Jun 26, 2018 6:42 am

Sometimes people think that the small amount they can contribute will not make much of a difference.....they should remember that their contribution can be seen as having its effect on the worst conditions. Your contributions don't just eliminate some small part of the suffering but rather it will eliminate some small part of the WORST suffering....
chownah

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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Kim O'Hara » Wed Jun 27, 2018 2:26 am

There are some ironies here but it is mainly a very good-news story about renewables replacing coal.
Tidal power to be trialled in Queensland coal port

Renewable tidal energy technology is set to be tested in one of Australia’s biggest coal ports in Gladstone, Queensland, marking the latest development in that region’s rapid shift to renewables that has been led by a number of significant utility-scale solar projects.

Sydney-based MAKO Tidal Turbines (MTT) and Gladstone Ports Corporation (GPC) say they are set to undertake a six month tidal turbine demonstration at the port, to investigate how tidal power could contribute to Australia’s future energy mix. The trial, expected to start in August, will be based on a MAKO turbine installed at GPC’s Barney Point Terminal, MTT says. ...

The company says its technology has the advantage of being able to be driven by rivers, canals and ocean currents and, given tidal flows can be accurately forecast years in advance, of offering a reliable source energy, suitable for grid integration or coupling with battery storage.

MTT CEO Douglas Hunt said the Gladstone Port, largely used for shipping Australian coal and gas, was an ideal testing site for the clean energy turbines.

“By using existing structures at GPC’s wharves, similar to those found around the world, MAKO tidal turbines can be installed cost-effectively and in much shorter timeframes than if floating or seabed mounting systems were used,” he said in comments on Tuesday. ...

As we have reported, Gladstone is home to Queensland’s largest coal generator, the 43-year-old Gladstone Power Station, which has a nameplate capacity of 1680MW, and is scheduled to be retired in the late 2020s.

But a number of major large-scale solar projects – in various stages of the development pipeline – are starting to shift the region’s focus to renewables.

Those projects include the 350MW Raglan Solar Farm (see map below) proposed by Eco Energy World, which won council approval in May, and the $500 million 300MW Aldoga solar farm, being proposed by Spanish renewables giant Acciona Energy through a 30-year lease with the state government. ...
:reading: https://reneweconomy.com.au/tidal-power ... ort-64171/

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Renewables and batteries alone - fantastical says James Hansen

Post by Leeuwenhoek » Fri Jun 29, 2018 6:57 pm

Climate scientists and activist James Hansen makes the point about the need for mix of technologies including nuclear power in this editorial:
We shouldn't "trick ... the public to accept the fantasy of 100 percent renewables"
A carbon fee is crucial, but not enough. Countries such as India and China need massive amounts of energy to raise living standards. The notion that renewable energies and batteries alone will provide all needed energy is fantastical. It is also a grotesque idea, because of the staggering environmental pollution from mining and material disposal, if all energy was derived from renewables and batteries. Worse, tricking the public to accept the fantasy of 100 percent renewables means that, in reality, fossil fuels reign and climate change grows.

... Young people are puzzled that, 25 years ago, President Clinton terminated R&D on next-generation safe nuclear power, the principal alternative to fossil fuel electricity.
It is not too late. My advice to young people is to cast off the old politics and fight for their future on technological, political, and legal fronts.

Young people and old people must understand the implications of the accompanying graph. The fight to phase down fossil fuel emissions is not yet being won.
Image
James Hansen, retired director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, directs the Climate Science, Awareness and Solutions program in the Earth Institute at Columbia University.
-- Excerpts from an editorial in the Boston Globe

Comment: A engaged Buddhism on climate changes needs to recognize a diversity of opinions on what constitutes a skillful response. The phrase "A Buddhist response ..." should be explained as one of several possible responses. Better yet, we should speak of 'Buddhist responses' (plural) or 'responses consistent with Buddhism'.

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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Kim O'Hara » Sat Jun 30, 2018 12:03 am

HI, Leeuwenhoek,
It is not too late. My advice to young people is to cast off the old politics and fight for their future on technological, political, and legal fronts.
That's where your quotation stopped. This is how Hansen continued:
It will not be easy. Washington is a swamp of special interests and, because of the power of the fossil fuel industry, our political parties are little concerned about the mess they are leaving for young people.
Young people have great potential political power, as they showed in their support of Barack Obama in 2008 and Bernie Sanders in 2016. However, it is not enough to elect a leader who spouts good words. It is necessary to understand needed policies and fight for them.
The best way to fight for the carbon fee and dividend
is to join Citizens’ Climate Lobby, which now has more than 90,000 members but needs more, especially young people. CCL members are appropriately polite and respectful as they cajole politicians in Washington. If they were joined by the fire of young people that was demonstrated in 2008 and 2016, even the mighty fossil fuel industry would take notice. [emphasis added]
That should be read in the context of this passage, earlier in his piece:
As long as fossil fuels are cheap, they will be burned and emissions will be high. Fossil fuel use will decline only if the price is made to include costs of pollution and climate change to society. The simplest and most effective way to do this is by collecting a rising carbon fee from fossil fuel companies at domestic mines and ports of entry.
That is, Hansen's primary concern is to drag down fossil fuel consumption, not to promote nuclear. Yes, he does call "next-generation safe nuclear power" the "principal alternative to fossil fuel electricity," (emphasis added) but that's all he says about nuclear power in this op-ed.
Personally, I think he's over-optimistic about nuclear and under-optimistic about renewables. I also think that he takes for granted a consumption-driven economic model which is totally incompatible with a sustainable society.
But those are my opinions and I acknowledge them as such.

:namaste:
Kim

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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Leeuwenhoek » Sun Jul 01, 2018 7:24 pm

2016. The idea that renewable energy can power the UK is an “appalling delusion”, according to the final interview given by former chief scientific adviser, the late Professor Sir David MacKay.

The sensible energy and climate change plan for the UK, MacKay said, was for the country to focus on nuclear power and carbon capture storage technology, which traps the carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning. In that scenario, the amount of wind and solar the UK needed would be almost zero, he said.

However, solar could be a very important power source in other countries, he said, where sunny summers coincided with a big demand for electricity for air conditioning. Prof MacKay also said electric cars are going to be a “massive hit” but said he was “very disappointed” by the lack of progress on CCS, after the government cancelled a pioneering £1bn programme at the last minute.

Prof MacKay was a physicist at the University of Cambridge and served as chief scientific adviser to the Department of Energy and Climate Change (Decc) from 2009-2014. He had gained public prominence after writing a book, Sustainable Energy - without the Hot Air, which assessed the potential of energy technologies from physical principles.

... “There is this appalling delusion that people have that we can take this thing that is currently producing 1% of our electricity and we can just scale it up and if there is a slight issue of it not adding up, then we can just do energy efficiency,” he said. “Humanity really does needs to pay attention to arithmetic and the laws of physics – we need a plan that adds up.”

Prof MacKay had previously avoided being drawn into the political debate about energy, but told Lynas: “I have always tried to avoid advocating particular solutions but maybe because time is getting thinner I should call a spade a spade.”
-- https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... are_btn_fb
Sustainable Energy - without the Hot Air (free book) http://withouthotair.com/

----------------------
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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Leeuwenhoek » Sun Jul 01, 2018 7:50 pm

4th Generation nuclear power systems are impressively much more safe than the current 3rd generation designs but it can re-cycle nuclear waste from other power plants. The re-cycling feature, so-called "breeder reactors", is a technology that the US was preparing to rolled out 30 years years ago before the program was delayed and then finally canceled.

There is also a international organization of nations working on different joint designs for 4th generation reactors. Australia is the most recent full member.
Bill Gates and China partner on world-first nuclear technology
Bill Gates' nuclear firm TerraPower and the China National Nuclear Corporation have signed an agreement to develop a world-first nuclear reactor, using other nuclear reactors' waste.

... Fourth generation Travelling Wave Reactors would differ from third generation, more traditional light water nuclear reactors, as they would not require enriched uranium to generate energy, and could instead use waste uranium.

Travelling Wave Reactors would require less fuel per kilowatt-hour of electricity than light-water reactors, due to TWRs higher fuel burn, energy density, and thermal efficiency. ... They could also recycle their own fuel, with only 20 to 35 per cent of the fuel rendered unusable by the fission process.

It is also safer as spent fuels, such as depleted uranium, from other reactor types could be recycled without separating out plutonium, and could operate without refuelling for up to 40 years.
TerraPower states that the US currently holds approximately 700,000 tonnes of depleted uranium, and the reactor would only need eight tonnes of this material to power 2.5 million homes for a year.
-- https://www.smh.com.au/business/bill-ga ... zfrf0.html
Australia recently joined an international group focused on fourth generation nuclear technology.

In September, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation was welcomed into the Generation IV International Forum Framework agreement, which aims to develop next-generation nuclear power systems, and which ANSTO calls "a potential game-changer in global energy creation".

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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by Kim O'Hara » Tue Jul 03, 2018 11:50 am

I really think this is all more complicated than it needs to be, but it does show that we're nowhere near the limits of solar+storage ideas.
Imagine a house where all the electricity is generated by rooftop solar.

Now imagine that, in addition, the stove, hot water and heating systems are all powered by the leftover energy.

It sounds like an emission-free pipedream, but the technology may be one step closer with the launch of a $3.3 million pilot project in Perth's south.

Canadian gas giant ATCO is building a micro-grid at its Jandakot base, which will convert solar power into hydrogen fuel.

The micro-grid will use 1,100 solar panels to produce electricity, which will either power ATCO's buildings or be diverted into battery storage.

Any leftover electricity will be used to power an electrolyser, which splits oxygen from hydrogen using water and an electric charge.

The oxygen is released, while the so-called "green" hydrogen is captured and stored.

The micro-grid will then store the hydrogen in two ways — using a fuel cell or injecting it into the reticulated natural gas network, to create a "greener", lower-carbon fuel.

Blended natural gas and hydrogen fuels are already used in other countries and ATCO plans to test different blends at its operations.
Go to http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-03/r ... gh/9934862 to see the animated graphic of how it all fits together, and get a few more facts and figures.

:thumb:
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Re: Climate change mitigation and adaptation - omnibus thread

Post by chownah » Tue Jul 03, 2018 1:05 pm

This is really nothing new AT ALL! I've been talking about it on line for a few years now. THe use of hydrogen is the guaranteed proof positive that storage of power from renewables in the form of hydrogen gas can (if it is even needed) provide all the storage necessary...period.
Hydrogen Economy (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_economy)
The first three sentences:
The hydrogen economy is a proposed system of delivering energy using hydrogen. The term hydrogen economy was coined by John Bockris during a talk he gave in 1970 at General Motors (GM) Technical Center.[1] The concept was proposed earlier by geneticist J.B.S. Haldane.[2]
I really do not understand why this hasn't gotten more attention....of course I also do not understand why I have not gotten more attention :tantrum:
chownah

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