The War on Plastic

Applying the Dharma for the preservation of planet Earth and its inhabitants
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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Thu Jul 05, 2018 10:30 am

Screenshot from Facebook ...

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Fri Jul 06, 2018 5:59 am

More positively - but also from FB -

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:thumb:
Kim

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Thu Oct 25, 2018 10:19 am

The EU is moving towards a ban on single-use plastics. You might help then move a little faster by signing this petition - https://actions.sumofus.org/a/eu-single ... stic-vote/
An overwhelming majority in the European Parliament just voted to strengthen the EU's plan to cut plastic pollution. Tough rules on single-use plastic items in Europe could save marine life all over the globe.

Ideally we could stop to celebrate this historic moment, but there’s a massive danger ahead: The European Commission has spoken, the European Parliament has spoken, but Europe’s governments could still make rotten compromises for corporations.

Europe's 28 Environment Ministers are meeting on October 29. Now is our time to tell them we want oceans free of plastic pollution, and polluters held accountable for the harm that they cause.

Insiders say some governments are already pushing to strengthen the law. But they are up against the most powerful corporate interests in the world. Let’s raise our voices for people over profits:

Tell all EU governments to support and strengthen the single-use plastics law!
:namaste:
Kim

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Sat Oct 27, 2018 1:59 am

Done!

:twothumbs:
The European Parliament voted overwhelmingly Wednesday for an EU-wide ban on single-use plastics such as straws, cutlery, cotton buds and balloon sticks.

The European Commission, the 28-nation EU's executive arm, proposed banning such items that it said account for 70 percent of the waste in the oceans and beaches.

"Today we are one step closer to eliminating the most problematic single-use plastic products in Europe," the EU's environment commissioner Karmenu Vella said. ...
https://www.sbs.com.au/news/single-use- ... parliament

Now ... who's going to be next?

:popcorn:
Kim

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Polar Bear
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Polar Bear » Sat Oct 27, 2018 8:12 pm

I personally am disgusted by the monstrous thick plastic bags at grocery stores now. I want a complete and utter ban on all plastic bags at all stores, not just grocery ones.

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Sat Oct 27, 2018 10:27 pm

Polar Bear wrote:
Sat Oct 27, 2018 8:12 pm
I personally am disgusted by the monstrous thick plastic bags at grocery stores now. I want a complete and utter ban on all plastic bags at all stores, not just grocery ones.
Good plan!
And some of us are getting there, however slowly.
My state introduced a ban on lightweight supermarket bags earlier this year and they have largely been replaced with heavier multi-use bags which customers pay for if they don't bring their own to the shop. Many of those bags are plastic too :tantrum: but at least they are made from recycled plastic. My impression is that the initial resistance faded quite quickly and the changeover is going well.

Queensland is not alone, of course. Click these links for US progress:
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/23/nyre ... -york.html
http://www.ncsl.org/research/environmen ... ation.aspx

Asia and Africa, perhaps surprisingly, are well ahead (in theory, at least):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase-out ... astic_bags

:twothumbs:
Kim

chownah
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by chownah » Sun Oct 28, 2018 2:06 am

Like it used to be with soda bottles....a deposit which is returned when the bag is returned.....children will delight in finding discarded ones and will use it to by more soda with which to rot thier teeth, make them hyper active, and result in premature kidney failure.......and the beat goes on.....
chownah

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Sun Oct 28, 2018 4:52 am

chownah wrote:
Sun Oct 28, 2018 2:06 am
Like it used to be with soda bottles....a deposit which is returned when the bag is returned.....children will delight in finding discarded ones and will use it to by more soda with which to rot thier teeth, make them hyper active, and result in premature kidney failure.......and the beat goes on.....
chownah
Don't need deposits for that - https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-10-28/ ... y/10438754

:coffee:
Kim

:focus:

chownah
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by chownah » Sun Oct 28, 2018 8:20 am

Perhaps you missed my point....which is that having a returnable deposit on bags would virtually guarantee that they would be used more times and then if they are discarded someone will remove them from the trash stream and keep them from being a menace. This is old technology as it was almost univerasally used for beverage bottles up until the throw away plastic bottles took over.
chownah

Kamran
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kamran » Mon Oct 29, 2018 12:10 am

lyndon taylor wrote:
Mon Jul 02, 2018 12:53 pm
It seems to me like the ban literally increases the amount of plastic in the environment. 1 reusable new bag equals the plastic of 4 old plastic bags, so that's progress????
Huge progress if you are in the petroleum or plastics industry.

They need to put the executives on trial as was done in the smoking industry.

What happened in the smoking industry seems like a good precedent.

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Mon Oct 29, 2018 1:03 am

Kamran wrote:
Mon Oct 29, 2018 12:10 am
lyndon taylor wrote:
Mon Jul 02, 2018 12:53 pm
It seems to me like the ban literally increases the amount of plastic in the environment. 1 reusable new bag equals the plastic of 4 old plastic bags, so that's progress????
Huge progress if you are in the petroleum or plastics industry.
If the one reuseable bag is used 4 times, the amount of plastic is the same. Here, at least, I reckon each reuseable bag is used 10 or 20 times, so there is a net advantage.
Add the fact that the reuseables are made from recycled plastic which would have gone to landfill if there wasn't a use for it, and we're actually well ahead.
They need to put the executives on trial as was done in the smoking industry.

What happened in the smoking industry seems like a good precedent.
Yes.

:jedi:
Kim

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Wed Oct 31, 2018 11:49 am

The scope of the problem is graphically shown here - https://metro.co.uk/2018/10/29/man-coll ... e-8084730/
Man collected all the the plastic he used for a year – and this is what it looks like
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Kim

Dan74
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Dan74 » Wed Oct 31, 2018 3:28 pm

Plastic bags cost roughly 5c here and I see the vast majority of people bringing their own bags. The reason may be less the cost and more the awareness. While the ban is good, the more important issue is fostering the culture where we both passively (by using less and more sustainably) and actively (by restoring eroded habitats, raising awareness, etc) take care of the environment, and treat it as a civic duty, not a badge of honour or any such nonsense.

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Wed Nov 07, 2018 7:26 am

Clicktivism opportunity :smile:
The EU could have the world’s most powerful law against single-use plastic by Christmas.

Corporations like Philip Morris, Coca-Cola, and Nestlé could finally be forced to pay for their plastic pollution. But big business lobbyists have been pouring poison into the ears of EU governments for months, to litter the new law with voluntary measures, delays, and loopholes.

We are drowning in plastic. And it won’t stop until the corporations that make throwaway plastic products and packaging are forced to pay for it.

Now, more than ever, EU governments need to hear us say we want them to ensure that plastic polluters are held accountable for the harm that they cause.

Tell EU governments to support a strong law, and ensure that producers pay for their plastic pollution! ...
Sign the petition at https://actions.sumofus.org/a/eu-single ... stic-vote/

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Kim

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Buck McGeehy
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Buck McGeehy » Fri Nov 09, 2018 5:47 am

I am skeptical about the ban on plastic straws. It seems like a distraction from other measures which could have a greater impact, such as stronger environmental regulation of industrial polluters. Plus, people with disabilities draw the short straw.
https://www.environmentalleader.com/201 ... -backlash/

The more attention is diluted to side issues like plastic straws, the more benefit to industrial polluters. People think they're doing something to make a difference when there is so much more that could be done.
Engaged Buddhism - A movement within Buddhism which puts emphasis on taking affirmative actions within one's community to address manifest human suffering such as poverty, hunger, environmental harm, and public health issues.

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Fri Nov 09, 2018 6:20 am

Contrariwise, the more small winnable battles are chosen and won, the more winnable the battles on bigger issues will become.
:juggling:

Why not do both?

:twothumbs:
Kim

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Buck McGeehy
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Buck McGeehy » Fri Nov 09, 2018 6:39 am

Kim O'Hara wrote:
Fri Nov 09, 2018 6:20 am
Why not do both?
True. Personal choices can, little by little, have a market impact. Some perspectives:



https://www.breakfreefromplastic.org/20 ... dont-suck/
Engaged Buddhism - A movement within Buddhism which puts emphasis on taking affirmative actions within one's community to address manifest human suffering such as poverty, hunger, environmental harm, and public health issues.

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Fri Nov 09, 2018 11:39 am

:D

:twothumbs:
Kim

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Sat Nov 10, 2018 7:51 am

Platic waste is just as much subject to market settings as any other trade, as this chart shows -
plastics flow chart 2.jpg
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Source: https://www.facebook.com/newplasticseconomy/

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Kim

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:28 pm

A petition -

http://action.storyofstuff.org/sign/sto ... -solutions
Beverage industry: stop killing plastic pollution solutions

Our #breakfreefromplastic brand audit showed that plastic bottles are one of the most common types of plastic pollution on earth. These bottles choke our oceans and ecosystems, fuel climate change, and are contributing to a human health crisis.

But there is a solution -- plastic bottles don’t need to become pollution.

A growing group of countries and US States are reducing their plastic footprint with container deposits. They incentivize the recovery of bottles by charging a refundable deposit on each bottle returned. The best systems have virtually eliminated littered bottles.

But the beverage industry, including members of the top three polluters identified by our brand audit -- Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and Nestle -- have funded industry groups lobbying against new container deposit laws. They’re doubling down on plastic pollution despite everything we know about its effects!

The big brands are rolling out greenwashing strategies with their left hand and crushing solutions with their right. Our brand audit has highlighted the enormous responsibility these brands have to reduce their plastic footprint. Enough’s enough, it’s time to expose their double standards.

Speak out now and join our campaign to hold the real litterbugs accountable for plastic pollution.
The tactics outlined here are exactly the tactics of other industries - especially tobacco and fossil fuels - caught deliberately harming people for profit. Fortunately, we now know the tactics and know they can be beaten.

:jedi:
Kim

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