The War on Plastic

Applying the Dharma for the preservation of planet Earth and its inhabitants
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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Wed Nov 21, 2018 6:58 am

Dead sperm whale found in Indonesia had ingested '6kg of plastic'

Items found included 115 drinking cups, four plastic bottles, 25 plastic bags and two flip-flops.

The carcass of the 9.5m (31ft) mammal was found in waters near Kapota Island in the Wakatobi National Park late on Monday.

The discovery has caused consternation among environmentalists. ...
:reading:
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-462 ... TxLtihnAGI

:candle:
Kim

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Mon Nov 26, 2018 10:12 pm

Kim O'Hara wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 6:58 am
Dead sperm whale found in Indonesia had ingested '6kg of plastic'

Items found included 115 drinking cups, four plastic bottles, 25 plastic bags and two flip-flops.

The carcass of the 9.5m (31ft) mammal was found in waters near Kapota Island in the Wakatobi National Park late on Monday.

The discovery has caused consternation among environmentalists. ...
:reading:
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-462 ... TxLtihnAGI

:candle:
Kim
Sea Shepherd's response:
stomach-contents.jpg
stomach-contents.jpg (56.87 KiB) Viewed 2299 times

chownah
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by chownah » Tue Nov 27, 2018 1:55 am

It's nice to sea that at least the sperm whales are serious about cleaning up the plastic debris polluting the oceans......maybe this is an indication of where the real intelligence is.
My wife (a thai woman) attended a wat (temple) meeting (pretty much the same thing as a city council meeting) and when they talked about plans for an upcoming celebration she suggested that they not use plastic plates and utensils (the way it is always done) and instead use non-plastic bio-degradeable ones even if they cost a bit more.....this happened in a small village in rural thailand.....in a small village in rural thailand this is a very brave move. I'm asking all you who read stuff here if you have taken such direct action towards this issue....or any other issue for that matter.

Be brave....it is direct action that has the best chance to achieve results.
chownah

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:33 am

:twothumbs:

:goodpost:

Actions like that are what we need, everywhere.

:namaste:
Kim

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Fri Nov 30, 2018 11:14 am

This sounds very promising -
A new plastic recycling technology converts a liability into an asset

The extent of the problems around plastic waste has shocked the world. The scale of damage is enormous and the challenges have seemed insurmountable.

Plastic waste is a global crisis.

So far, the world has looked at it as an unsightly menace to be removed, but Professor Thomas Maschmeyer has gone beyond that idea. His work challenges our perceptions of waste, by turning plastic into an asset that people would actively seek out to recycle because it can make them money.

“Of course, everyone is concerned about plastic waste, but the reality is, they also need to use plastic,” says Professor Maschmeyer from the University of Sydney's School of Chemistry. “Our recycling method reconciles those two ideas.” ...
https://sydney.edu.au/research/research ... asset.html

Scaling it up is going to take time, of course, but it's a step in the right direction.

:thumb:
Kim

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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Virgo » Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:04 am

This looks like very interesting tech:

http://skansi.fo/oceanplastic?gclid=EAI ... gIcNvD_BwE

Here is a video:


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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:40 pm

Virgo wrote:
Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:04 am
This looks like very interesting tech:

http://skansi.fo/oceanplastic?gclid=EAI ... gIcNvD_BwE

...
Well, it's a step in the right direction. I can't see it having much effect in the open ocean (3 metre scoops in a 3000 kilometre bucket? Get real!) but it could be useful in harbours and estuaries.

:namaste:
Kim

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:41 pm

Australia Cuts 80% of Plastic Bag Use in 3 Short Months

Despite a few hiccups along the way, Australia's plastic bag consumption has dropped drastically.

Three months after two of the largest supermarket chains banned plastic grocery bags, an estimated 1.5 billion bags have been prevented from use, the Australian Associated Press reported, citing the National Retail Association.

Overall, the bans introduced by Coles and Woolworths last summer resulted in an 80 percent reduction in the country's overall use of the single-use item, the retail group revealed.

"Indeed, some retailers are reporting reduction rates as high as 90 per cent," National Retail Association's David Stout told the news service. ...
https://www.ecowatch.com/australia-plas ... 80343.html

The article goes on to compare Australia with other countries - bans, taxes, etc.

:thumb:
Kim

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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Sun Dec 23, 2018 4:39 am

A good overview of the problem and the most viable solutions -
You Can't Just "Clean Up" the Plastic in the Ocean. Here's Why.

Since the early 1950s, there has been an estimated 8.3 billion tons — and counting — of plastic produced on the planet, according to a 2017 study published in the Science Advances journal. The United Nations Environment Program reports that roughly 60% of that lump sum has made its way to landfills or the ocean. Each year, an estimated 8 million metric tons of plastic ends up in the ocean, according to the advocacy group Ocean Conservancy. Some calculations predict that there could be more plastic by weight in the ocean than fish by 2050.

The situation is so dire that the ocean is already home to five notable trash vortexes, more commonly known as garbage patches ...

Emma Tonge, a communications and outreach specialist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Debris Program, tells Teen Vogue that "prevention is the key to solving the marine debris problem over time." She uses the analogy of an overflowing sink: You can’t fix the buildup without turning off the faucet. ...
:reading: https://www.teenvogue.com/story/you-can ... -the-ocean

:namaste:
Kim

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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Fri Jan 04, 2019 11:18 am

Container deposit schemes do work -
... Shoppers have received the equivalent of more than £30,000 in total for recycling plastic bottles in the first supermarket trial using “reverse vending machines” installed to reduce littering.

The machines, introduced last year by the Iceland chain at five UK sites, reward consumers with a voucher worth 10p for every deposit of a bottle purchased at the shops.

Iceland, a frozen food specialist, said figures published Wednesday suggested the trial had delivered “significant results” and strong consumer engagement, with 311,500 plastic bottles recycled so far. In November alone a daily average of 2,583 bottles were recycled across the five sites, with an average of £250 in coupons refunded each day. ...
:reading: https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... h-shoppers

:twothumbs:
Kim

chownah
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by chownah » Fri Jan 04, 2019 1:52 pm

Kim O'Hara wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 11:18 am
Container deposit schemes do work -
... Shoppers have received the equivalent of more than £30,000 in total for recycling plastic bottles in the first supermarket trial using “reverse vending machines” installed to reduce littering.

The machines, introduced last year by the Iceland chain at five UK sites, reward consumers with a voucher worth 10p for every deposit of a bottle purchased at the shops.

Iceland, a frozen food specialist, said figures published Wednesday suggested the trial had delivered “significant results” and strong consumer engagement, with 311,500 plastic bottles recycled so far. In November alone a daily average of 2,583 bottles were recycled across the five sites, with an average of £250 in coupons refunded each day. ...
:reading: https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... h-shoppers

:twothumbs:
Kim
AS I said in a previous post on this thread but mostly addressing the plastic bag issue:
.......... having a returnable deposit on bags would virtually guarantee that they would be used more times and then if they are discarded someone will remove them from the trash stream and keep them from being a menace. This is old technology as it was almost univerasally used for beverage bottles up until the throw away plastic bottles took over.
chownah
Also, as I said in a previous post:
Isn't single use plastic a bad thing because of its danger to wildlife?

I think from a climate standpoint it is not so bad if it does not degrade and is landfilled as it usually is then it will just sit there for a thousand or more years I think.

Am I mistaken?
chownah
No reply yet to this. If a plastic bag or a plastic bottle gets turned in to redeem the deposit (something children of my generation were keen to do with glass beverage bottles) then really if the plastic gets recycled it is a good thing but even if the condition of the plastic makes it unrecyclable the article can be landfilled which will be a long term sequestration of the carbon which would be emitted if it was burned and also it will not pose a danger to wildlife. Of course it is preferred to recycle the plastic (waste not want not) but even with just landfilling the plastic really alot (perhaps most) of the harm is avoided.
chownah

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Fri Jan 04, 2019 10:08 pm

chownah wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 1:52 pm
...
AS I said in a previous post on this thread but mostly addressing the plastic bag issue:
.......... having a returnable deposit on bags would virtually guarantee that they would be used more times and then if they are discarded someone will remove them from the trash stream and keep them from being a menace. This is old technology as it was almost univerasally used for beverage bottles up until the throw away plastic bottles took over.
chownah
It's true that putting a $$ value on an item makes a difference but I doubt that making plastic bags returnable is going to work.
There's not enough plastic in most of them to be worth reclaiming, the cleanliness issues are problematic, and bags are so varied that standardised processing could be impossible.
There are easier, more productive targets for recycling.
chownah wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 1:52 pm
...Also, as I said in a previous post:
Isn't single use plastic a bad thing because of its danger to wildlife?

I think from a climate standpoint it is not so bad if it does not degrade and is landfilled as it usually is then it will just sit there for a thousand or more years I think.

Am I mistaken?
chownah
No reply yet to this. If a plastic bag or a plastic bottle gets turned in to redeem the deposit (something children of my generation were keen to do with glass beverage bottles) then really if the plastic gets recycled it is a good thing but even if the condition of the plastic makes it unrecyclable the article can be landfilled which will be a long term sequestration of the carbon which would be emitted if it was burned and also it will not pose a danger to wildlife. Of course it is preferred to recycle the plastic (waste not want not) but even with just landfilling the plastic really alot (perhaps most) of the harm is avoided.
chownah
You're right about the climate impact of plastic - nearly zero, whether we recycle it or send it to landfill or just let it blow around the streets.
But viewtopic.php?f=17&t=203&start=60#p4436 is not really funny.

:namaste:
Kim

chownah
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by chownah » Sat Jan 05, 2019 1:27 am

Kim O'Hara wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 10:08 pm
chownah wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 1:52 pm
...
AS I said in a previous post on this thread but mostly addressing the plastic bag issue:
.......... having a returnable deposit on bags would virtually guarantee that they would be used more times and then if they are discarded someone will remove them from the trash stream and keep them from being a menace. This is old technology as it was almost univerasally used for beverage bottles up until the throw away plastic bottles took over.
chownah
It's true that putting a $$ value on an item makes a difference but I doubt that making plastic bags returnable is going to work.
There's not enough plastic in most of them to be worth reclaiming, the cleanliness issues are problematic, and bags are so varied that standardised processing could be impossible.
There are easier, more productive targets for recycling.
chownah wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 1:52 pm
...Also, as I said in a previous post:
Isn't single use plastic a bad thing because of its danger to wildlife?

I think from a climate standpoint it is not so bad if it does not degrade and is landfilled as it usually is then it will just sit there for a thousand or more years I think.

Am I mistaken?
chownah
No reply yet to this. If a plastic bag or a plastic bottle gets turned in to redeem the deposit (something children of my generation were keen to do with glass beverage bottles) then really if the plastic gets recycled it is a good thing but even if the condition of the plastic makes it unrecyclable the article can be landfilled which will be a long term sequestration of the carbon which would be emitted if it was burned and also it will not pose a danger to wildlife. Of course it is preferred to recycle the plastic (waste not want not) but even with just landfilling the plastic really alot (perhaps most) of the harm is avoided.
chownah
You're right about the climate impact of plastic - nearly zero, whether we recycle it or send it to landfill or just let it blow around the streets.
But viewtopic.php?f=17&t=203&start=60#p4436 is not really funny.

:namaste:
Kim
THis is exactly why a deposit on plastic article is a good solution. When there is a cash reward for returning plastic articles then those plastic articles will not be blowing around the street or endangering wildlife....they will be either be reused or recycle or safely tucked away in a landfill......that is why I suggested a redeemable deposit for plastic bags.
chownah

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Sat Jan 05, 2019 3:19 am

Kim O'Hara wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 10:08 pm
...It's true that putting a $$ value on an item makes a difference but I doubt that making plastic bags returnable is going to work.
There's not enough plastic in most of them to be worth reclaiming, the cleanliness issues are problematic, and bags are so varied that standardised processing could be impossible.
There are easier, more productive targets for recycling.
...

:namaste:
Kim

chownah
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by chownah » Sat Jan 05, 2019 8:52 am

Kim O'Hara wrote:
Sat Jan 05, 2019 3:19 am
Kim O'Hara wrote:
Fri Jan 04, 2019 10:08 pm
...It's true that putting a $$ value on an item makes a difference but I doubt that making plastic bags returnable is going to work.
There's not enough plastic in most of them to be worth reclaiming, the cleanliness issues are problematic, and bags are so varied that standardised processing could be impossible.
There are easier, more productive targets for recycling.
...

:namaste:
Kim
The amount of plastic is irrelevant. If a plastic bag has a deposit attached then it will be brought back to a collection point....at that collection point it will be routed to a landfill where it will be sequesterd and not causing harm in the environment. It would work for anything....if plastic flip-flops had a deposit on them then when they wore out they would be returned to the collection point where the deposit would be refunded an the worn out flip-flops would be sent to a landfill where it would be seuquestered and not causing any harm to the environment.
The amount of plastic an article contains is not an issue....the condition of the plastic is not an issue....the goal is to sequester these items so they do not pose a hazard to the environment. It is the environmental harm from unsequestered plastic garbage with is the main problem with use of plastic I think.
chownah

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:52 am

Via an Aussie friend who has been in Turkey recently:
A friend just posted this today from Turkey, after recent steps to reduce single use plastic bags there.....

The Turks are getting creative with the new charge for plastic bags at stores. One couple just led their donkey through the store and filled its saddle bags. Another man brought his wheelbarrow and filled it. Some ladies have been spotted sewing up holes in old plastic bags.


:smile:
Kim

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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Sat Jan 26, 2019 4:34 am

Big brands revisit the milkman model to cut plastic pollution

(Reuters) - Major packaged goods sellers and retailers, under pressure to cut the flow of single-use plastic bottles and containers clogging the world’s waterways, have teamed with recycling and shipping firms on an e-commerce service that puts a twist on the old-fashioned milkman.

Called Loop and announced at the World Economic Forum in Davos on Thursday, it delivers products such as orange juice, shampoo and laundry detergent in reusable glass and metal bottles to shopper doorsteps and retrieves the empties for cleaning and reuse.

Launch partners include recycling firm and Loop parent TerraCycle; shipper United Parcel Service Inc; consumer packaged goods sellers Procter & Gamble Co, Unilever Plc, PepsiCo Inc and Coca-Cola European Partners Plc; and retailers Carrefour and Tesco Plc. Loop’s unveiling comes just months after China’s decision to stop collecting and processing plastic waste escalated alarm over environmental damage to the world’s oceans.

The service launches in May with projects in Paris and the New York/New Jersey/Pennsylvania area. A UK program is slated for later in 2019, with Toronto, Tokyo and California to follow next year.
:reading: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-davo ... SKCN1PI14Z

:thumb:
Kim

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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Sat Mar 09, 2019 10:11 pm

The scale of the problem, in graphic images from the Philippines - https://www.greenpeace.org/internationa ... ooks-like/

:namaste:
Kim

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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Kim O'Hara » Wed Mar 27, 2019 6:04 am

A very cute - and effective - beach clean-up intervention
As some rumours swirl around the internet that there will be more plastic than fish by 2050, there are also some great stories about local recycling, like this one about Goby The Fish.

This local beach decided to do something simple, instead of just placing a ton of boring old garbage cans around the beach, they made a giant see through fish out of some barbed wire and mesh, and added a sign to it that said “Goby loves plastic, please feed him”.

The key to the success was that kids had no pleasure in recycling plastics into those old crusty blue bins, but when it turned into a game where they had to “feed” Goby it just took off. ...
http://yupthatexists.com/goby-plastic-beach-fish/

:thumb:
Kim

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Re: The War on Plastic

Post by Virgo » Mon Jun 17, 2019 6:34 pm



Kevin

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