Bill Maher: The Fudge Report

Applying the Dharma to social justice issues – race, religion, sexuality and identity
Post Reply
User avatar
DNS
Site Admin
Posts: 391
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2018 12:49 am
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada, Estados Unidos de América
Contact:

Bill Maher: The Fudge Report

Post by DNS » Sat Sep 07, 2019 3:06 pm

Bill Maher calls himself a Democrat, but he's really not much of a liberal, more of a centrist. He's anti-PC, anti-victimology, tends to be fiscally conservative, and bashes the Democrats all the time. However, he also bashes Trump and Republicans all the time.

I watch his show on Friday nights, sometimes it's fairly funny and he has some good clips sometimes. Here is one clip from last night:



I suppose it might be considered controversial as it might be called "fat-shaming" but he raises some interesting points about personal responsibility. Should those who are healthy, exercise regularly, eat nutritious foods be subsidizing those who do not (for example in national health insurance "socialized medicine" systems)? I understand about compassion, but what about personal responsibility?

Bundokji
Posts: 225
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2018 9:03 pm

Re: Bill Maher: The Fudge Report

Post by Bundokji » Sat Sep 07, 2019 7:22 pm

I think its more difficult to assign responsibility to obesity in the same way we do with other behaviors that we consider harmful. One reason is that the act of eating itself is considered necessary and healthy (unlike smoking or drinking for example). Also not all forms of obesity are a result of overeating. There seem to be genetic factors as well as age (metabolism declines the older we get).

Also the harm caused by obesity to others is not as straightforward as smoking or drinking. It takes more imagination and analyzing to conclude that the negative impacts of overeating transcends the individual.

It is a sensitive issue for good reasons, which is our identification with our bodies and the way we look. When we smoke or drink, we don't take much offense when we get criticized because the results of this behavior has little connection to what we believe we are.

Regarding Bill Maher being a centrist, i think he is only one of many liberals who moved to the right as a reaction to what is perceived as the "excesses of the modern left". Hard core liberals already began to attack him:

'Too much knowledge leads to scepticism. Early devotees are the likeliest apostates, as early sinners are senile saints.' – Will Durant.

User avatar
DNS
Site Admin
Posts: 391
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2018 12:49 am
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada, Estados Unidos de América
Contact:

Re: Bill Maher: The Fudge Report

Post by DNS » Sat Sep 07, 2019 9:57 pm

Bundokji wrote:
Sat Sep 07, 2019 7:22 pm
I think its more difficult to assign responsibility to obesity in the same way we do with other behaviors that we consider harmful. One reason is that the act of eating itself is considered necessary and healthy (unlike smoking or drinking for example). Also not all forms of obesity are a result of overeating. There seem to be genetic factors as well as age (metabolism declines the older we get).
Yes, good points. It's "easier" to get addicted to food since it's not something we can "just say no" to like other things; we need it to survive. And for some it might lead to eating "comfort foods" which are highly addictive and fattening, especially during stress, some are more prone to consume those.

justsit
Posts: 82
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2018 12:19 pm

Re: Bill Maher: The Fudge Report

Post by justsit » Sun Sep 08, 2019 2:58 pm

As a health care professional I've seen firsthand the affects of obesity on body systems and the medical system in general.

Obviously, diabetes and its comorbidities comes to mind first, but there are many others not as obvious - for example, delayed wound healing with longer hospital stays after surgery; high rate of joint replacement, especially knees; increased incidence of sleep apnea; back problems. Costs of health care increase as special equipment is needed to accommodate more obese patients - larger commodes, beds, wheelchairs, OR tables, blood pressure cuffs, etc, etc. More medical personnel sustain injuries trying to assist large patients. I could go on, but it is apparent that all these issues come with increased monetary expenditure.

What to do? Almost 40% of Americans are obese, and now 6% are clinically "morbidly obese" with a BMI over 40. It is very difficult and requires commitment, determination, and a lot of willpower to lose large amounts of weight, so what would encourage people to do so? Our current system in which primary care providers chastise and cajole and give handouts isn't working.

Maybe we should reward personal responsibility and incentivize good health? Lower personal health insurance costs if goals are met. Give credit for healthy behavior (some of this is being done already, it's a start). Money talks in America, make health a $ benefit. Make Mcdonalds expensive and Whole Foods cheap (ha, now I'm dreaming....).

User avatar
DNS
Site Admin
Posts: 391
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2018 12:49 am
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada, Estados Unidos de América
Contact:

Re: Bill Maher: The Fudge Report

Post by DNS » Sun Sep 08, 2019 4:51 pm

Thanks for your post, especially as a health care professional, seeing the issues on a regular basis.
justsit wrote:
Sun Sep 08, 2019 2:58 pm
Maybe we should reward personal responsibility and incentivize good health? Lower personal health insurance costs if goals are met. Give credit for healthy behavior (some of this is being done already, it's a start). Money talks in America, make health a $ benefit. Make Mcdonalds expensive and Whole Foods cheap (ha, now I'm dreaming....).
:thumb: I like this idea. Before Obamacare my wife and I had a 'major-medical' insurance policy, so basically was only for major problems, surgery, cancer, etc. The plan didn't cover regular check-ups or anything else and we didn't need it since we have a healthy lifestyle. But then Obamacare came and insurance companies were forced to provide more coverage, major medical wasn't available any more. Our insurance premiums sky-rocketed upwards.

We eat one meal a day at one of the casino buffets here in Vegas or at a salad bar buffet here in town. I have semi-jokingly suggested that they should charge based on weight. They could have a scale by the cashier and so someone 300 lbs (about 136 kg) might pay $60 and someone 115 lbs. (about 52 kg) might pay only $8.

The heavier people tend to eat more, so it could be justified in that they consume more food. And then it would encourage people to lose weight, to get a better price next time. :tongue:

justsit
Posts: 82
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2018 12:19 pm

Re: Bill Maher: The Fudge Report

Post by justsit » Mon Sep 09, 2019 2:26 pm

Agree, carrots usually work better than sticks!

I once worked as a subcontractor for an insurance company, doing quality management reports. The company was a Medicaid provider and was required to report to the state on the compliance and efficacy of the care being delivered.

One measure looked at frequency of prenatal visits for pregnant women. Studies have clearly shown that comprehensive prenatal care results in fewer complications at delivery, overall healthier babies, and thus lower costs. So the company came up with a plan to reward moms by giving them a free baby stroller for going to all six of the recommended prenatal visits. The plan was very successful. So win for the mom, win for the baby, win for the state (fewer complications = lower costs), win for the insurance company, win for a healthier nation.

Of course, not all issues are quite that simple, but there's no reason some type of incentive program for diabetes, hypertension, and weight management couldn't be developed. A few dollars up front might save a whole lot later.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 17 guests