Chaplin's monologue

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fwiw
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Chaplin's monologue

Post by fwiw » Sun Oct 06, 2019 7:10 am

Do you think Buddhists can fully agree with this monologue of Charlie Chaplin at the end of The Dictator?


I’m sorry, but I don’t want to be an emperor. That’s not my business. I don’t want to rule or conquer anyone. I should like to help everyone - if possible - Jew, Gentile - black man - white. We all want to help one another. Human beings are like that. We want to live by each other’s happiness - not by each other’s misery. We don’t want to hate and despise one another. In this world there is room for everyone. And the good earth is rich and can provide for everyone. The way of life can be free and beautiful, but we have lost the way.

Greed has poisoned men’s souls, has barricaded the world with hate, has goose-stepped us into misery and bloodshed. We have developed speed, but we have shut ourselves in. Machinery that gives abundance has left us in want. Our knowledge has made us cynical. Our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery we need humanity. More than cleverness we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost….

The aeroplane and the radio have brought us closer together. The very nature of these inventions cries out for the goodness in men - cries out for universal brotherhood - for the unity of us all. Even now my voice is reaching millions throughout the world - millions of despairing men, women, and little children - victims of a system that makes men torture and imprison innocent people.

To those who can hear me, I say - do not despair. The misery that is now upon us is but the passing of greed - the bitterness of men who fear the way of human progress. The hate of men will pass, and dictators die, and the power they took from the people will return to the people. And so long as men die, liberty will never perish. …..

Soldiers! don’t give yourselves to brutes - men who despise you - enslave you - who regiment your lives - tell you what to do - what to think and what to feel! Who drill you - diet you - treat you like cattle, use you as cannon fodder. Don’t give yourselves to these unnatural men - machine men with machine minds and machine hearts! You are not machines! You are not cattle! You are men! You have the love of humanity in your hearts! You don’t hate! Only the unloved hate - the unloved and the unnatural! Soldiers! Don’t fight for slavery! Fight for liberty!

In the 17th Chapter of St Luke it is written: “the Kingdom of God is within man” - not one man nor a group of men, but in all men! In you! You, the people have the power - the power to create machines. The power to create happiness! You, the people, have the power to make this life free and beautiful, to make this life a wonderful adventure.

Then - in the name of democracy - let us use that power - let us all unite. Let us fight for a new world - a decent world that will give men a chance to work - that will give youth a future and old age a security. By the promise of these things, brutes have risen to power. But they lie! They do not fulfil that promise. They never will!

Dictators free themselves but they enslave the people! Now let us fight to fulfil that promise! Let us fight to free the world - to do away with national barriers - to do away with greed, with hate and intolerance. Let us fight for a world of reason, a world where science and progress will lead to all men’s happiness. Soldiers! in the name of democracy, let us all unite!

Final speech from The Great Dictator Copyright © Roy Export S.A.S. All rights reserved

The Great Dictator was Chaplin’s first film with dialogue. Chaplin plays both a little Jewish barber, living in the ghetto, and Hynkel, the dictator ruler of Tomainia. In his autobiography Chaplin quotes himself as having said: “One doesn’t have to be a Jew to be anti Nazi. All one has to be is a normal decent human being.”

Chaplin and Hitler were born within a week of one another. “There was something uncanny in the resemblance between the Little Tramp and Adolf Hitler, representing opposite poles of humanity, ” writes Chaplin biographer David Robinson, reproducing an unsigned article from The Spectator dated 21st April 1939:
“Providence was in an ironical mood when, fifty years ago this week, it was ordained that Charles Chaplin and Adolf Hitler should make their entry into the world within four days of each other….Each in his own way has expressed the ideas, sentiments, aspirations of the millions of struggling citizens ground between the upper and the lower millstone of society. (…) Each has mirrored the same reality – the predicament of the “little man” in modern society. Each is a distorting mirror, the one for good, the other for untold evil.”

Chaplin spent many months drafting and re-writing the speech for the end of the film, a call for peace from the barber who has been mistaken for Hynkel. Many people criticized the speech, and thought it was superfluous to the film. Others found it uplifting. Regrettably Chaplin’s words are as relevant today as they were in 1940.
Transcript of Charlie Chaplin’s Final Speech in The Great Dictator
... in my opinion

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fwiw
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Re: Chaplin's monologue

Post by fwiw » Sun Oct 06, 2019 7:14 am

SBC's redo wasn't too bad either


... in my opinion

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: Chaplin's monologue

Post by Kim O'Hara » Sun Oct 06, 2019 10:51 am

fwiw wrote:
Sun Oct 06, 2019 7:10 am
Do you think Buddhists can fully agree with this monologue of Charlie Chaplin at the end of The Dictator?
...
This one can.
:smile:
But not because it's particularly Buddhist, and not particularly because I'm Buddhist. More because the system it aspires to is one under which everyone would have a reasonable chance of a good life.

:namaste:
Kim

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fwiw
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Re: Chaplin's monologue

Post by fwiw » Sun Oct 06, 2019 11:59 am

Yes, the question is whether it sounds compatible with Buddhist values, not whether every Buddhist should agree.
... in my opinion

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SethRich
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Re: Chaplin's monologue

Post by SethRich » Wed Oct 09, 2019 12:27 am

Greetings,
fwiw wrote:
Sun Oct 06, 2019 7:10 am
Do you think Buddhists can fully agree with this monologue of Charlie Chaplin at the end of The Dictator?
fwiw wrote:
Sun Oct 06, 2019 11:59 am
Yes, the question is whether it sounds compatible with Buddhist values, not whether every Buddhist should agree.
The goalposts are moving too much for me to say too much on this topic.

I will say this though... his goal "to do away with national barriers" is also not immune from his observation that "dictators free themselves but they enslave the people!". Perhaps he naively thought a global NWO government would be more benevolent or accountable to people than national governance? Or was he an anarchist?

:shrug:

To wit, I can agree with some of the intent, but without agreeing on the proposed solution. It's far too Bolshevik for me to "fully agree on".

:candle:
"Let us neither be perpetrators nor victims!" (DN26)

:candle: "...his name was Seth Rich..."

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fwiw
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Re: Chaplin's monologue

Post by fwiw » Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:00 am

SethRich wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 12:27 am
fwiw wrote:
Sun Oct 06, 2019 7:10 am
Do you think Buddhists can fully agree with this monologue of Charlie Chaplin at the end of The Dictator?
fwiw wrote:
Sun Oct 06, 2019 11:59 am
Yes, the question is whether it sounds compatible with Buddhist values, not whether every Buddhist should agree.
The goalposts are moving too much for me to say too much on this topic.
I genuinely don't understand how the goalposts seem to have been moved. It might be a language thing where words have unintended connotations? Or would I have done it without realizing? I just reread both statements and I fail to see how they contradict one another

I will say this though... his goal "to do away with national barriers" is also not immune from his observation that "dictators free themselves but they enslave the people!". Perhaps he naively thought a global NWO government would be more benevolent or accountable to people than national governance? Or was he an anarchist?
I can see how this may sound bad to some ears. But perhaps he meant places like DharmaWheel where we can exchange, having electronically "done away with national barriers"?

Personally, I think in an utopian world where all countries would be comparatively rich, opening borders could be viable. I don't think it would be necessarily wise to open all borders now

To wit, I can agree with some of the intent, but without agreeing on the proposed solution. It's far too Bolshevik for me to "fully agree on".
I think it would be interesting then to hear what you think on these other parts and why you disagree? That is the whole goal to this topic


Personally, I can fully agree with the following part:
We want to live by each other’s happiness - not by each other’s misery. We don’t want to hate and despise one another.

That is what comes to my mind for example when I see things like this:

"How Neo-Liberals Profit off of Poverty"
... in my opinion

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SethRich
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Re: Chaplin's monologue

Post by SethRich » Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:30 am

Greetings fwiw,
fwiw wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:00 am
Personally, I think in an utopian world where all countries would be comparatively rich
Yes, I agree with this. Interestingly, societies tend to become rich when they adopt market capitalism, have law and order, and actively seek to weed out corruption. Ironically, promoting these things nowadays is likely to see you on the end of a trumped up "impeachment inquiry".

8-)
fwiw wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:00 am
I think it would be interesting then to hear what you think on these other parts and why you disagree? That is the whole goal to this topic
Much of it, I just see as a now irrelevant product of its times. The calls to human emotions are nice and all, but the proposed solutions are not viable or realistic. To quote from another piece of art, the song "Twentieth Century" by Pet Shop Boys, lyricist Neil Tennant notes, "sometimes the solution is worse than the problem". I think this is worth considering the next time Bolsheviks try selling us grand schemes which are directly opposed to those factors noted above as critical success factors for a "comparatively rich" world. They never build upon what already exists... instead, they want to smash it down for the promise of something better, usually fuelled by the three poisons of hatred, greed and ignorance. I think history shows that such revolutionary movements rarely pan out for the best.

Kind regards.

:candle:
"Let us neither be perpetrators nor victims!" (DN26)

:candle: "...his name was Seth Rich..."

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fwiw
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Re: Chaplin's monologue

Post by fwiw » Wed Oct 09, 2019 6:24 am

SethRich wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:30 am
Yes, I agree with this. Interestingly, societies tend to become rich when they adopt market capitalism, have law and order, and actively seek to weed out corruption. Ironically, promoting these things nowadays is likely to see you on the end of a trumped up "impeachment inquiry".
I can open another thread about this if need be, but do you think this is what Trump is trying to do?

Much of it, I just see as a now irrelevant product of its times. The calls to human emotions are nice and all, but the proposed solutions are not viable or realistic. To quote from another piece of art, the song "Twentieth Century" by Pet Shop Boys, lyricist Neil Tennant notes, "sometimes the solution is worse than the problem". I think this is worth considering the next time Bolsheviks try selling us grand schemes which are directly opposed to those factors noted above as critical success factors for a "comparatively rich" world. They never build upon what already exists... instead, they want to smash it down for the promise of something better, usually fuelled by the three poisons of hatred, greed and ignorance. I think history shows that such revolutionary movements rarely pan out for the best.
I would have liked to know which parts, perhaps highlighted in another color in the text, if this is not too much to ask? I'll understand though if you don't wish to cooperate.
... in my opinion

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SethRich
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Re: Chaplin's monologue

Post by SethRich » Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:09 am

Greetings fwiw,
SethRich wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:30 am
Yes, I agree with this. Interestingly, societies tend to become rich when they adopt market capitalism, have law and order, and actively seek to weed out corruption. Ironically, promoting these things nowadays is likely to see you on the end of a trumped up "impeachment inquiry".
fwiw wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 6:24 am
I can open another thread about this if need be, but do you think this is what Trump is trying to do?
100%.
SethRich wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:30 am
I would have liked to know which parts, perhaps highlighted in another color in the text, if this is not too much to ask? I'll understand though if you don't wish to cooperate.
I'm not sure "which parts" you want me to link to what, but it was the proposal of open borders globalism that was the key issue for me. The stuff that seemed like a "now irrelevant product of its times" were the strong Modernist overtones, and the WW2-inspired bit about the "machine men with machine minds and machine hearts" etc. which doesn't really apply to modern warfare, in a world that's largely without conscription or expansionist genocidal regimes like Nazism or Communism. It's obviously a remnant of more "stoic" times, in contradistinction to the current Snowflake Generation and the Extinction Rebellion crusties who could in fact do with learning to be a bit more rational, logical, methodical, equanimous and calm - machine-like, if you will. The pendulum is other than where it was in 1940.

:ugeek:

:candle:
"Let us neither be perpetrators nor victims!" (DN26)

:candle: "...his name was Seth Rich..."

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fwiw
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Re: Chaplin's monologue

Post by fwiw » Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:50 am

SethRich wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:09 am
The stuff that seemed like a "now irrelevant product of its times" were the strong Modernist overtones, and the WW2-inspired bit about the "machine men with machine minds and machine hearts" etc. which doesn't really apply to modern warfare, in a world that's largely without conscription or expansionist genocidal regimes like Nazism or Communism.
That's an interesting take.


I would tend to think that death machines are more prominent in warfare than ever, the person pushing the killing button increasingly sitting in front of a computer monitor on the other side of the planet, emotionally completely removed from the situation on the ground, murdering humans like one would step on ants

September 13, 2019 : (original title:) "The U.S. and China Race Over AI and Killer Robots"

New title : China and the U.S Are Fighting a Major Battle Over Killer Robots and the Future of AI

https://time.com/5673240/china-killer-robots-weapons/


Also very recently:

U.S. Drones 30 Pine Nut Farmers In Afghanistan

... in my opinion

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